Analogy

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68 comments posted
Halp

Is "Now the arrow comes back around" an analogy for a bad thing coming to bite you in the a**?

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 01/17/2017 - 05:47
Analogy

Parables, Metaphors, Similes, Allegory, and Exemplification are literary devices used in making analogies.

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 12/13/2016 - 11:47
This is an analogy

on is to off as light is to switch

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 09/19/2016 - 23:01
What is a good Analogy for Photography?

HELP ASAP
I chose my literary device as a analogy. My speech is about how photography made me realize to always document your life by taking photos because photos capture a moment forever.... Let me know if anyone thinks of anything? thank you.

Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 10/16/2015 - 01:26
It is the same with

It is the same with photography as with drawing. :)

Posted by Anonymous on Sun, 09/25/2016 - 21:28
heres an idea

use the comparison on how photos are far superior than documents when it comes to memories.

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 03/07/2016 - 01:13
Halp

What would a simple example of an analogy be?

Posted by Anonymous on Sun, 09/13/2015 - 00:57
Is this an analogy

a rose is a type of flower
or is a rose a category of flowers

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 04/06/2015 - 22:39
It is a type of flower

It is a type of flower

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 02/03/2016 - 01:39
Analogy

In Things Fall Apart- "like the snapping og a tightened bow"(Achebe 61).
Is this an analogy???

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 02/18/2015 - 18:39
nope

simile ;) note to self

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 10/10/2016 - 07:08
Thats a simile

Thats a simile

Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 05/08/2015 - 22:52
English

What about "....Gods made of wood and stone."

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 01/28/2015 - 01:25
I'm not an expert, but I

I'm not an expert, but I would say that it would be a metaphor because it is saying the "Gods" are "made of wood and stone"

Posted by Anonymous on Sun, 09/13/2015 - 01:01
english

that should be a lower case "g" on the gods there. and for one thing those are just the same as any old hunks of wood and stone, they just happened to have been carved.

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 05/13/2015 - 16:33
Actually it's a pronoun so

Actually it's a pronoun so Gods is spelled fine

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 05/25/2015 - 19:02
how bout meet orange reds

how bout meet orange reds delicoius cousin

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 09/30/2014 - 06:37
What device is this

honesty is broke

Posted by Anonymous on Sun, 09/14/2014 - 11:44
Personification

It is Personification. It seems as though honesty is a person with little or no money, giving honesty human characteristics and physical attributes.

Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 04/10/2015 - 07:39
Pesonification

"Honesty" is here given a transit quality normally associated with a sentient being, which is normally (not always!) a human; A person. It causes the subject to "come alive", as it were.

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 09/16/2014 - 15:11
>:3

Smart. Also it's personification. Not pesonification. XD

Posted by Anonymous on Sun, 11/02/2014 - 04:34
Analogy?

"Once I got a fish-line, but no hooks." in Adventures of Huckleberry Finn & he's talking about how he tried to pray, but it wasn't working for him

Posted by Anonymous on Sat, 08/16/2014 - 21:51
Are these similes/metaphors or analogies ?

What would these 2 quotes be

"And God, it felt like some kind of ancient place"

"The cliffs were like giant guardians standing tall"

Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 07/11/2014 - 03:35
totally simile

as soon as you see "like", it automatically becomes a simile

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 05/13/2015 - 16:36
It is an analogy because it's

It is an analogy because it's referring back to the noun which is god

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 04/01/2015 - 15:53
im pretty sure theyre similes

im pretty sure theyre similes considering that "like" is used mostly in similes.

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 01/13/2015 - 03:42
Help me

We are fighting to save the whole world from the pestilence of Nazi tyranny and in defense of all that is most sacred to man.

Posted by Anonymous on Sun, 03/30/2014 - 04:33
What is the difference between analogy and a simile/ metaphor?

I need help/

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 01/22/2014 - 04:51
A simile uses the words like

A simile uses the words like or as to compare two things
ex: He was as quiet as a mouse
A metaphor conpares two things without using the words like or as
ex: He was a brick wall when he played football
The simile is comparing the man being quiet to a mouse, and the metaphor is comparing the man to a brick wall

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 01/23/2014 - 02:30
That's not entirely accurate

A simile usually uses the word "like" or "as to", as a means of comparing two objects on the basis of a similar characteristic, with emphasis on the shared quality. As in your example, "He was a quiet as a mouse", both the man and the mouse are quiet.

A metaphor, on the other hand, does not compare two objects per se, but leans more on the side of equating the two, on the basis of a similar characteristic. It's quite a subtle difference, but I would argue that metaphor's have a more powerful effect that similes. In your example, "He was a brick wall when he played football", there is no real reference to the shared characteristic. Instead, he IS a brick wall, rather than he WAS LIKE a brick wall.

Both come under the same group of devices I would say, but different in a more subtle way than how you put it.

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 10/28/2015 - 05:29
ANALOGY?

What if an event in a chapter is analogous to another event of the chapter--somewhat foreshadowing?

Posted by Anonymous on Sun, 12/08/2013 - 01:11
what is this

what literary device this is: it surely had been made for jim and no one else

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 09/26/2013 - 01:23
what is this?

what literary divice is this: the traffic would be a nasty monster on it own.

Posted by Anonymous on Sun, 09/08/2013 - 22:30
:)

It is personification because traffic is an inanimate thing and therefore can not be a monster.

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 05/29/2014 - 23:06
device

not divise.

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 02/10/2014 - 01:50
literary devices

metophor, most likely

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 12/19/2013 - 17:08
Metaphor

It is a metaphor

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 10/08/2013 - 02:58
what is this???

what literary device would this be: i felt that i had been slapped out of the human race

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 08/21/2013 - 00:54
hyperbole

hyperbole

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 09/04/2013 - 03:14
English

Every thing is hard

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 04/08/2013 - 13:55
another example please

another example please

Posted by Anonymous on Sat, 03/30/2013 - 16:29
Which one is?

What literary device is "Dog eats dog world?"

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 03/25/2013 - 02:06
euphemism

I think calling it a euphemism would be most appropriate.

Posted by Anonymous on Sun, 08/30/2015 - 17:28
Hackneyed saw

It could be claimed, though inaccurately, this is an analogy. People preferring to be careful with words eschew such "nit-witticisms". The all inclusiveness of world here automatically invalidates what little meaning is born. Factually, dogs do not eat dogs, another anthropocentric bias towards a noble species. Dogs' viciousness among one another is clearly purposeful to establish and maintain hierarchy, wounding for sport is not done. This is unlike human politics. I give these for examples as to why cliché sayings do not carry a weight of intended meaning. As a literary device one might include these insipid idioms in a person's dialog, especially if this person fancies themself as sharp and snarky. The irony being that their repertoire of poison arrows is hardly the quiver of quips they imagine, in truth only a pack of impotent pokey pins that annoy. - DJ Erickson

Posted by Anonymous on Sun, 07/20/2014 - 05:37
aaah

the difference is just da sem

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 02/13/2013 - 08:44
example

what is a anology in a book?

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 11/14/2012 - 23:37
awesome

awesome

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 11/13/2012 - 13:46
What literary device is

What literary device is "drove me out of my mind"?

Posted by Anonymous on Sat, 10/06/2012 - 19:37
Paradox?

How can one be in one's mind?

Posted by Anonymous on Sun, 11/09/2014 - 22:35
It is an idiom

It is an idiom

Posted by Anonymous on Sat, 08/17/2013 - 13:40

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