Authorial Intrusion

Comments

47 comments posted
The Princess Bride

The Princess Bride (the book, not the movie) is a great example of this.

Posted by Anonymous on Sun, 08/20/2017 - 03:34
Poems

Would you refer to personal opinions made by a poet in their poem rather than an author in their novel as 'Authorial Intrusion' or is there another term to describe authorial intrusion in poetry ?

Posted by Anonymous on Sun, 02/05/2017 - 14:21
query

What is authorial intrusion in Fielding's Tom Jones?

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 12/29/2016 - 17:42
Deadpool.

Enough said.

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 02/18/2016 - 23:44
So true

hahahahahahaha so true this literally made me fall of my chair whilst doing my homework lol. xD

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 03/07/2017 - 20:41
True

Very true

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 04/26/2016 - 20:44
HELP

is authorial intrusion used in plays?

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 12/21/2015 - 16:32
.

its called monologue :)

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 05/30/2016 - 01:15
also

called breaking the fourth wall

Posted by Anonymous on Sat, 12/31/2016 - 02:27
yes

Yes if the narrator, pauses the scene and talks about while the other characters in the set remain idle.

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 12/23/2015 - 21:12
ok

ok

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 12/03/2015 - 01:00
Rudyard Kipling's Just So

Rudyard Kipling's Just So Stories have authorial intrusion.

Posted by Anonymous on Sun, 11/01/2015 - 17:51
Does the great gatsby chapter nine counts?

As nick talks as if he's talking to someone.

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 10/13/2015 - 13:33
The Gift of the Magi

O. Henry does this at the end of the story to give the reader the moral of the story.

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 04/08/2015 - 21:04
Dickens-

Authorial infusion is used very well in the beginning chapter of Oliver Twist!

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 03/26/2015 - 21:59
Authoral intrusion

Pseudonomynous Bach (am I spelling right?) secret series. He talks to the reader a lot

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 03/19/2015 - 16:37
Yeah

yep i think that's right, a very good example.

-tentacles133

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 04/19/2016 - 03:14
help

Can anyone tell me if this happens in the novel invisible man by Ralph Ellison?

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 01/19/2015 - 09:23
Why is it breaking the fourth

Why is it breaking the fourth wall?

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 12/09/2014 - 20:52
It stems from a theatrical

It stems from a theatrical term. The "fourth wall" is where the audience sits looking through it when viewing a 3-sided, traditional stage. When an actor would say a line directly to the audience, it would be called breaking the wall because there was no longer that separation.

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 04/14/2015 - 03:55
Hunchback of Notre Dame

All throughout the book, particularly when the narrator is speaking of architecture and the city itself.

Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 09/19/2014 - 18:36
Edith Nesbit

Multiple times, in every story that she wrote, Edith Nesbit talks to the audience. She did it in a wonderful way, and especially because she was a children's author, it really helps the reader connect to the story. In The Enchanted Castle she even talks about herself to the reader a bit.

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 09/18/2014 - 04:32
Authorial Intrusion In Jane Eyre

The author, at the end of Jane Eyre, says something on the lines of this-"What else can I tell you, reader, she married him."

Instead of reading about the marriage taking place through the actions and dialogue of the characters, the author intrudes on the proceedings of the story-or pauses it-and tells the reader herself that her characters got married.

This is a good example of authorial intrusion.

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 08/26/2014 - 07:21
The Curious Incident

In Hadden's "The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time," the first-person narrator steps out of the story he's telling to explain to the reader why he has numbered the chapters the way he has.

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 06/04/2014 - 10:08
I would say otherwise

Because the narrator is the one referring to the reader and not the author himself, I would argue that this is direct address and not authorial intrusion. It is however, a good example because the device is used throughout the novel.

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 02/24/2016 - 01:34
Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen

Throughout 'Northanger Abbey', Austen passes judgement on the characters, 18th century society and the disillusioned readers of gothic novels.

Eg. "This brief account of the family is intended to supersede the necessity of a long and minute detail from Mrs Thorpe herself, of her past adventures and sufferings, which might otherwise be expected to occupy the three or four following chapters;"

This intrusion made by Austen, mocks the character Mrs Thorpe who tends to talk too much especially when it is regarding herself.

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 05/26/2014 - 12:28
TV Show Example

Showtime's television show "House of Lies" is a great example of this. You see the main character Marty Kaan stepping out of the scene momentarily to give commentary or explain something occurring within the scene.

Posted by Anonymous on Sun, 05/04/2014 - 00:29
Online Writers

These are really good

Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 03/28/2014 - 05:31
i know right

i know right

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 09/15/2015 - 20:07
THE GREAT GATSBY

Calling himself the author, Nick comes in and says things like, "Rereading what I've just wrote...", etc, which suggests a certain awareness that he is the author, and, while it isn't F. Scott Fitzgerald, it is a deviation from the flow of the novel and even a deviation from Nick's normal way of speaking, and therefore I think it would be apt to refer to it as an authorial intrusion.

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 01/20/2014 - 23:05
"The Things they Carried"

This happened a lot throughout the book the things they carried.

Posted by Anonymous on Sat, 01/18/2014 - 07:35
Great book, and yes, there

Great book, and yes, there surely was plenty of authorial intrusion.

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 10/07/2014 - 01:58
entertainment

it can also be looked at when the narrator which to entertain the reader by drawing his attention with talk or humorous talk, out of the real stream of the story

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 12/26/2013 - 00:06
TV Example

In the show Malcolm in the Middle, Malcolm often stops and looks straight at the audience (into the camera) while speaking instead of at the other cast members.

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 10/17/2013 - 06:14
Example

Another excellent example is the Book Thief. Death, the narrator, stops the story numerous time to make casual conversation with the reader.

‘In all honesty and I know I’m complaining excessively now’… I was till getting over Stalin, in Russia…. Then came Hitler.'

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 10/03/2013 - 03:13
Yes, although the effect was

Yes, although the effect was to make the story seem more magical and surreal

Posted by Anonymous on Sun, 05/08/2016 - 12:52
A Good Example

Ever read Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events? He does this all the time.

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 07/29/2013 - 23:19
Great Expectations

There's a good example of this in Great Expectations when Dickens breaks away from the story and asks the reader if they've ever looked at their life for the good events and the bad; I'm pretty sure he compares it to a chain of flowers and thorns.

Posted by Anonymous on Sun, 07/21/2013 - 09:18
In the tropes world

It's basically breaking the third wall....
This happens at the end of the first chapter in The Scarlet Letter

Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 04/19/2013 - 06:14
correction

It's not breaking the third wall", it is "breaking the fourth wall".

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 12/04/2013 - 05:06
It is also in many cartoons

The main character would pause out of a scene and give their point of view on what is to come.

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 04/08/2013 - 05:20
i do not get it

i still dont get wat it means? can someone please explain? in easy words

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 03/04/2013 - 08:11
Explanations

Say this is in a novel, and the main character (let's say in first person perspective) stops talking about what's happening around him/her and starts more or less talking to you, the reader. Like some form of monologue to the person reading this hypothetical novel.

Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 09/20/2013 - 04:53
It means...

It means that they are taking themselves out of character, like if you read a story about a girl's narrative of her life and suddenly the tone changes, it's a good chance that the author is taking a stand in the story. Hence, Authorial intrusion. ^u^

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 03/07/2013 - 19:39
Does this work?

" This was the terror of the poor being whom the reader has perhaps not forgotten-little Cosette."

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 12/03/2012 - 05:49
Online Authors

Many online stories do this. Fanfiction authors and other online authors do this often.

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 08/27/2012 - 03:47
San Manuel Bueno

The last part where the author intervenes...

Posted by Anonymous on Sun, 12/18/2011 - 07:49

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