Irony

Comments

150 comments posted
Is this irony

Can the lonely take the place of you?

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 10/27/2016 - 20:45
Is this irony?

TV show begins with a guy having a quickie with a random woman. It's portrayed as rather impersonal and the guy isn't fully enjoying the experience.

At the end of the show the same guy has met another woman who invites an afternoon tryst but he turns her down because it's heavily implied he has true feelings for her even though he wants to.

Is this irony? If it's something else, what is it?

Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 07/29/2016 - 18:43
Is this irony

"This was the very heart of the haunting" it's from the woman in black and I'm not sure. Can I please have an answer asap

Posted by Anonymous on Sun, 07/10/2016 - 15:41
seems more like

seems more like personification

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 10/26/2016 - 01:02
Is this irony

In which your house can burn up as it burns down,

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 06/13/2016 - 17:11
Is this considered situational irony?

"They move around in these webs almost blind, yet they never misstep or get lost".

Posted by Anonymous on Sun, 07/10/2016 - 21:56
Is this irony

I've never heard of the usage of "burning something up". I'm assuming that it follows a similar trend as "light it up", "beat it up", and such where "up" is just added for the sake of adding it. What you put sounds more like a play with words. It doesn't play with or change the meaning of sentence.

It would be ironic if the author was describing a fire as a house fire, making the reader think it was a fire that consumed your average house... when instead the fire had consumed an entire mansion estate (by no means a regular house fire).

Another irony would be if the reader learned of a fire on a certain street that had a hay seller, old-style Japanese door vendor, or Wally's warehouse of flammable goods (I don't know), making one expect that it would be the source of the fire... only to find that it was actually the firehouse across the street that was on fire.

Posted by Anonymous on Sun, 06/19/2016 - 23:24
the hot zone

is it ironic for the character to say "good thing this ain't Marburg" when you find out later in the story that it was?

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 06/08/2016 - 23:02
the hot zone

yes i believe it would be verbal irony.

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 06/09/2016 - 23:57
The Hobbit

Is there any irony in The Hobbit?

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 05/17/2016 - 05:07
These literary devices help

These literary devices help me a 100 percent with my project

Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 02/05/2016 - 04:39
Does sarcasm count?

does sarcasm count

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 01/25/2016 - 21:46
something similar to irony

something similar to irony sarcasm but yes it counts.

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 10/12/2016 - 03:36
sarcasm does count

it is a form of verbal irony

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 01/28/2016 - 03:33
Sarcasm does count

Of course it does it is amazing. It is my favorite irony.

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 09/27/2016 - 21:06
irony

Presence of irony in poetry create interest in reader's mind

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 05/11/2016 - 17:30
Sarcasm

yes

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 01/28/2016 - 02:53
juleus caesar,a drama of william shakespeare

Desius brutus interpretes the nightmare of calpurnia into a
favourable dream.

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 01/20/2016 - 03:18
Is there any ir0ny in the

Is there any ir0ny in the st0ry of Love in the c0rnhusk

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 01/04/2016 - 15:52
Help

Is there any irony in the story of the ugly duckling?

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 11/18/2015 - 20:40
ugly duckling

yes. it is ironic that the "ugly duckling" turns out to be the most beautiful of all the ducks (because it is a swan)

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 04/25/2016 - 06:04
irony dramatic

A married man sold his wife n daughter into slavery but after 20 yes married the daughter unknowingly. Is it irony n what type.

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 11/03/2015 - 10:25
"Isn't it ironic"

Sorry, that is not irony. That is just poetic justice.

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 11/30/2015 - 15:12
Dramatic Irony

This would possibly be dramatic irony, as the audience has knowledge of what has happened to his daughter while he did not.

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 11/09/2015 - 05:13
nacho libre

Do you think that irony would be a good literary term to use for a nacho libre paper?

Posted by Anonymous on Sun, 10/25/2015 - 23:57
Would this be considered irony..

"In all the great crowd, the only face he say and voice her heard was Christa's."

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 09/01/2015 - 23:39
No that would not be irony.

No that would not be irony.

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 09/24/2015 - 02:27
My favorite type of

My favorite type of figurative language is irony.

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 06/08/2015 - 23:41
Lol! This will help me

Lol! This will help me remember it. thanks!

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 12/03/2015 - 11:35
does irony have to include a

does irony have to include a symbol?

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 05/25/2015 - 01:20
It does not; it is a literary

It does not; it is a literary device used by the play of words, not symbols.

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 09/24/2015 - 02:27
Irony

Irony is sort of like a coincidence.

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 04/02/2015 - 00:03
No, it's not

That is the common understanding of irony but it is erroneous. Irony is when you expect one thing, but get the opposite, or when something is said sarcastically (I LOVE this steak (but the person really hates steak). Irony is when the expectation and the reality are opposite or vastly different. So therefore it is not coincidence.

Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 10/30/2015 - 18:04
No, it's still not

The common misperception that Irony in literature is "when something happens, but you don't expect it" has been used by middle school English teachers who don't know how to explain Irony to their students for generations. The truth of the matter, however, is that this definition is incorrect. The use of the term "expected" implies that Irony is a perception of the text by the reader. If that were true anything could be an example of Irony. Irony in literature is a significant action characterised by stark contrast to an earlier description of the character or setting.

Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 01/01/2016 - 18:36
An example on Irony

"Posting a video on youtube on how pointless and stupid youtube is" is ironic, i think

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 02/04/2015 - 16:48
yes

yes

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 09/22/2015 - 03:56
irony/sarcasm

So, basically in some situations, sarcasm can be a type of irony?

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 12/17/2014 - 06:33
Different types of irony

Yes, it is. It is actually verbal irony. The other two types are situational and dramatic.

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 05/21/2015 - 02:41
Yeah

Yes it is a type of irony. It is in fact the first type of irony most people hear.

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 03/04/2015 - 01:36
your so fancy

you already know

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 01/12/2015 - 15:13
lol

clever

Posted by Anonymous on Sun, 06/07/2015 - 15:45
You're

You're

Posted by Anonymous on Sun, 02/15/2015 - 23:43
I know I'm fancy, thank you.

I know I'm fancy, thank you.

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 02/10/2015 - 03:30
i'm in the fast lane

i'm in the fast lane

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 01/29/2015 - 20:53
From LA to Tokyo
Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 03/20/2015 - 16:35
you're all wrong

but it's I'M so fancy, not your so fancy!!

Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 11/06/2015 - 07:13
Irony definitions

If anyone needs the info...

Situational Irony= what is expected and what actually happens is different

Verbal Irony= something someone says but it is not really true

Dramatic Irony= something you (the reader) knows is goin to happen but character(s) in the book don't know it's going to happen

Overall, Irony= contrast between what is expected and what happens

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 12/15/2014 - 01:10
This really helped

Thank you, this was a huge help for a project I'm doing!

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 05/03/2016 - 21:38
Irony

"This new freedom that women enjoy is indeed a progressive step in a retrogressive world". Is this an example of irony. If not what kind of literary device is it?

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 12/01/2014 - 21:18
Ironic

One of the longest words in the english language is the fear of long words

Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 11/14/2014 - 03:04

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