Onomatopoeia

Comments

113 comments posted
confused

would "flapping of wings" be considered examples of onomatopoeia?

Posted by Anonymous on Sat, 11/26/2011 - 22:59
no

no

Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 04/12/2013 - 16:19
Nope

By saying that the wings are flapping, it's not really a sound, it's more just stating the action that the wings are doing.
To make the sound, perhaps you may use woosh or flap.
If you don't find that there's a sound that you can imagine when you use it, then it's not a sound.
You may become confused if maybe you say train on it's track. You're just stating where the train is. You can use something like chug, chuga, choo choo, or maybe the train roars. I think that using a sound by actually saying what it sounds like is something else, a different word, for example, a bee, bzzzzz, a car, rereererereeee, a train, woo. These are all separate from onomatopoeia and is considered something else. I'm not 100% sure though.

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 03/04/2013 - 15:07
mehbeh...

...no

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 12/10/2012 - 00:52
IT...

Is...And not... Flap can be considered as a sound word but in this case it isn't really a sound word

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 09/19/2012 - 15:04
Ummmm...

I wouldn't say that has an Onomatopoeia. Try whoosh or swish or flop or flip... do you understand now.

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 07/19/2012 - 23:35
umm

yea dont.

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 10/16/2012 - 00:53
Re:Confused

No, you would have to do something like "Flap" Or sometihng that wounds like the noise.

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 05/03/2012 - 16:44
im sorry but

nope

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 04/17/2012 - 00:57
Flap

the word flap might be an example but the words flapping of wings is not. The sound of the word "flap" sounds like a bird flapping it's wings. See other examples above.

Posted by Anonymous on Sat, 04/07/2012 - 20:49
UH HUHHH

POP!!!

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 11/22/2011 - 03:53
and...

ZIP!

Posted by Anonymous on Sun, 11/20/2011 - 12:46
nice

nice

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 01/22/2013 - 23:02

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