Periphrasis

Comments

23 comments posted
those new memes

you know the ones where it has the original picture with the short phrase, and as you go down the picture becomes even lower quality and even becomes hand drawn and the phrase just gets unnecessarily longer? i think they are doing this exact literary device : o

Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 09/29/2017 - 03:54
So...

So, it's like changing "Gotta go fast" to "I must proceed at a high velocity"?

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 09/28/2017 - 21:28
What is the opposite of periphrasis

What is the literary device when you condense a big sentence (i.e. a periphrasis) into a simple sentence?

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 03/14/2017 - 12:02
is there any diffrents

is there any diffrents between circumlocution and periphrasis

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 04/02/2015 - 20:38
grammar

are there any differences

Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 09/23/2016 - 07:29
Difference

Some say that they are synonyms, but in essence, circumlocution extends the point of the message to the point that the meaning doesn't stand anymore. Periphrasis extends the point, but the essence of the message is still graspable.

E.g. Circumlocution will phrase something in such a way that if you read that part of the passage alone, it is VERY difficult to understand. Periphrasis on the other hand will still enable you to understand the meaning.

Hope that helped. Writing my Shakespeare essay right now!

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 06/10/2015 - 07:29
Poetic diction

In its poetic diction....is it marked by circumlocution???

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 02/05/2015 - 19:10
Circumlocution

Circumlocution refers to speech that "speaks around" an issue as opposed to speaking directly and precisely to the point. Circumlocution implies avoidance of the question, or pretentiousness, or even stupidity- the speaker cannot get to the point, because he or she does not have a point. Thing of Polonius in Hamlet.

Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 11/03/2017 - 19:13
Sounds like Business Speak to me

Jargon and buzzwords and talking around subjects instead of addressing actual points.

Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 08/22/2014 - 22:40
Expert example

William Littlejohn, one of Doc's five aides.

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 01/29/2014 - 04:07
ice

ice

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 12/09/2013 - 23:35
Circumlocation & periphrasis

Circumlocation & periphrasis are one & the samethings

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 10/09/2013 - 01:43
What no, Periphrasis is

What no, Periphrasis is simply the use of too many words where as Circumlocution refers to the repetition of ideas!

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 03/17/2015 - 13:57
circumlocution

circum - > around locution - > speaking

speaking/writing all around the subject without really touching on it; beating around the bush

Posted by Anonymous on Sun, 08/09/2015 - 17:21
its quite informative

its quite informative

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 07/19/2012 - 07:43
this is kinda hard to

this is kinda hard to understand

Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 05/11/2012 - 03:19
When something could be said

When something could be said in a more straightforward way, periphrasis can be used to have the phrase/sentence be said in a more roundabout way, very much like politics ^_^

Posted by Anonymous on Sat, 03/29/2014 - 19:47
ummmm

ummmm

Posted by Anonymous on Sun, 05/06/2012 - 18:24
Reminds me of someone...

SHAKESPEARE ^.^

Posted by Anonymous on Sat, 02/18/2012 - 19:55
isn't this the same as

isn't this the same as circmlocution?

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 02/16/2012 - 06:17
Very much so.

Periphrasis comes from peri, meaning around, and phrasis, meaning diction. Circumlocution comes from circum, meaning around, and locu, meaning talk or speak.
They both pretty much just mean "around the words".

Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 08/31/2012 - 00:16
The Diffrence

Periphrasis is a round about way of saying somthing, wehreas metonymy is the oposite and is far more direct and is similar to syneckdoche in that it is a figure of speech that consists of the use of the name of one object or concept for that of another to which it is related, or of which it is a part.

e.g Police - The Law - metonymy

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 11/24/2011 - 18:33
What is the difference between periphrasis and metonymy?

How is it possible to differentiate them?

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 11/22/2011 - 15:15

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