Questions and Answers

Here you can ask general questions related to literary devices and site visitors can try and help answer them. If you have a question about a specific literary device please use the list on the left and ask your question in the comments section for that literary device.

Comments

367 comments posted
5sos tomorrow never dies

where are the poetic devices in this song???
[Ashton:]
(Tomorrow never dies)

[Calum:]
Life can be so hard to breathe
When you're trapped inside a box
You're waiting for a break to come
It always comes too late

You're on the edge just stumbling
And the road it starts to wind
But every time a page is turned
A chance to make it right

[Luke:]
Oh the sun will rise
Like a flame ignites

[Ashton:]
We're not done till we say it's over
We won't fade away

[Luke:]
Oh the sun will rise

[Ashton:]
Tomorrow never dies
(Tomorrow never dies)

[Calum:]
It's hard to see the enemy
When you're looking at yourself
Maybe your reflection shows you
Screaming out for help

And you try your best to just keep up
And your feet they fall behind
But the beat you're marching to
You're keeping perfect time

[Luke:]
Oh the sun will rise
Like a flame ignites

[Ashton:]
We're not done till we say it's over
We won't fade away

[Luke:]
Oh the sun will rise

[Ashton:]
Tomorrow never dies

[Calum:]
Try your best to change your fate
You can just enjoy the ride
The sun will rise, the moon will fall
Tomorrow never dies
(It never dies)

[Luke:]
Oh the sun will rise
(The sun will rise the sun will rise)
Like a flame ignites
(A flame ignites a flame ignites)

[Ashton:]
We're not done till we say it's over
We won't fade away

[Luke:]
Oh the sun will rise

[Ashton:]
Tomorrow never dies
Tomorrow never dies
Tomorrow never dies

Posted by Anonymous on Sat, 05/23/2015 - 21:54
help on this plz

What's the difference between amplification, and circumlocution?

Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 05/22/2015 - 16:24
what are the literally devices in this poem??? please help me !

Competitive Swimming
By: ElisaTheDuck

The swimmers are lined up behind their blocks.

And the competitors are in their positions pose.
the swimmers get ready to take flight like a bird.
They streamline all the way to the flags,
They start swimming in a steady crawl,
none of them for the first lap stall.
A swimmer slows down: the one in lane six.
They start sprinting on their remaining meters,
Their legs churning up water like crazy egg beaters.
Lane three is first, next is lane one,
And one by one the others are done.

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 05/21/2015 - 23:46
what literary devices are used here

She went walking with her dog on a Sunday morning
She walked by a church and felt the shame
Her mistake was thought over until the point of crying
Out on the bench she sat until the church folk came

She asked their forgiveness for not attending
She informed them that her decisions she would be mending
If only a second chance would they give to her
She would be loyal and attend the church forever

She goes to church and is now rejoicing
In serving God her Savior who is everlasting

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 05/19/2015 - 17:05
some alliteration

there is some alliteration is this poem "went walking with"

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 05/21/2015 - 18:34
what litecery divice would this be

the old man passed away

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 05/18/2015 - 16:10
totally a euphemism

it's a euphemism. euphemisms are milder terms used to describe something.

in your case the old man died, you politely phrased it by saying "passed away"

does this help you? please let me know ASAP so that i can keep looking for what you need

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 05/19/2015 - 16:49
What literary device is used in this sentence

"It? That was my first hint: something is wrong with this situation."

Posted by Anonymous on Sun, 05/17/2015 - 23:36
i don't understand

what part is the sentence. i could help you if i knew what you are saying.

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 05/19/2015 - 16:50
genres of novel

Please help me, what are the genres of novel? Is there any linguists who makes a classification about this? Thanks in advance.

Posted by Anonymous on Sun, 05/17/2015 - 14:11
Which literary device is used here?

If you want a red rose, you must build it out of music by moonlight, and stain it with your own heart's-blood.

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 05/12/2015 - 01:00
also alliteration

there is also alliteration used here. "red-rose" and "music by moonlight" are examples of alliteration.

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 05/19/2015 - 16:52
I think it might be Allegory

look up what allegory means, on this site, and see if that will help.

Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 05/15/2015 - 16:57
What literary term is used here

"Even after what came later, there was no bitterness in our memory of him."

Posted by Anonymous on Sat, 05/09/2015 - 22:24
it could be periodic struture

periodic structure is when the predicate is held off until the end of the sentence.

let me know if this satisfies you

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 05/19/2015 - 16:56
Sentence within a story -- what's it called?

What is the name of the technique wherein certain words in a paragraph are highlighted (bold, oversized, etc.) so that reading only those words conveys a complete sentence -- and reading the whole paragraph still makes sense? Here's what I'm talking about:

With all the different savings products out there, it’s sometimes hard to Get a clear idea of the right one to choose. Sure, you’re really high on earning great yields—but that’s not so easy to find if you want cash that’s handy to access at a local ATM; and since you’re socking away the maximum amount of money, shouldn’t you expect the maximum amount of security?

So if you only read the highlighted words, it says: Get high yields, easy cash access and maximum security

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 05/07/2015 - 23:53
Please help I can't find the name of this technique anywhere!!

What is it called when an author uses the same sentence or a similiar one at the beginning and end of a text? Is is some kind of a framing technique?

Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 05/01/2015 - 09:16
poetry

what does it mean when it askes what is the significance of the title?

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 04/30/2015 - 23:44
Its meanining in the context of a work

Usually when you are asked to interpret a title it means that you should say whether its symbolical - for example "The Rose for Emily" (I know this is prose but really interpreting the title is completely the same) means that the story is some kind of a tribute for Emily, something to remember her by. The title can identify the main character or a place important to them. It may also suggest some of the character's traits - when you have "The Old Astronomer" you already know there will be something about stars and that who he is is an important part of character's identity. The word "old" also suggests that he will either be not in full physical strength, very wise or very tired. So basically the significance of the title is its (symbolic) meaning in the context of the work. The tile is ALWAYS there to suggest you sth about the work. Hope this helps!

Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 05/01/2015 - 09:24
2 statements, the 2nd given as a definite conclusion from 1st

In other words, the writer believes that if you agree with the first statement then you must agree with the second, even though it may not be the only possible conclusion. When I've noticed this it seems the intent is to assert a strongly held opinion, not just advance a poorly thought out argument. Is this a literary device? If it isn't, do any language lovers out there know of a word to describe this? (I think that I have heard one.)
For example (not a very good one as it's not subtle):
"You are not a Christian; you do not know right from wrong."

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 04/23/2015 - 19:05
What is it called when an

What is it called when an author uses specific words to tell time, such as, "Then it happened." These specific words allow the readers to assume that something happened immediately. What is this literary device called if it even exists? Thanks.

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 04/20/2015 - 22:45
The term in linguistics that

The term in linguistics that describes this is deixis--when you have to know the context, particularly time and place, in order to understand the meaning of a word.

Back in 10 minutes. (when did the clock start ticking?)
Put the book over there. (where is "there"?)

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 05/14/2015 - 22:34
please help me

what language device is this
"even her name sounded sweet"
it's from the secret river by kate grenville

Posted by Anonymous on Sat, 04/18/2015 - 12:50
it's alliteration

"sounded sweet", that's alliteration. the repetition of a sound

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 04/21/2015 - 21:00
story to sum up person

what is the name of the kind of story which sums up, with one incident, the entire personality of the character? one incident which reveals the person's values.

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 04/16/2015 - 14:45
What literary device is this?

"And stole my heart away completely"

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 04/15/2015 - 04:53
personification / figurative

personification / figurative language etc

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 04/20/2015 - 09:09
What liteary device is being used?

Their voices knotted and tangled, blocking one another so that everything and nothing was being said at once?

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 04/14/2015 - 00:32
I think it's an oxymoron

"everything and nothing being said at once", that's an oxymoron.

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 04/21/2015 - 21:02
idiom

My English etcher told us about something called an idiom but I can't remember what is was. so what is an idiom?

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 04/09/2015 - 12:53
idiom

An idiom is a phrase or fixed expression that has a figurative, or sometimes literal, meaning.

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 04/23/2015 - 20:06
Which literary devices is

Which literary devices is knowledge is power, save yourself

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 04/09/2015 - 02:16
Peter Cottontail

I can't remember the literary device used here:

He’s got jelly beans for Tommy
Colored eggs for sister Sue
There’s an orchid for your mommy
And an Easter bonnet, too.

Neither he nor I have a sister Sue. Who are these people!
The lyricist is using them to represent all sisters and boys.

Anyone know what that device is called?

Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 04/03/2015 - 06:39
Symbolism?

This may be symbolism.
Tommy a symbol for all boys/brothers?
Sue a symbol all sisters?

People can be symbols. Like Ronald Reagan as a symbol of forgetfulness:
I forgot I illegally supported Contra death squads;
I forgot AIDS was a problem;
I forgot I tripled the Gross National Debt.
I hope everybody forgets this.

Posted by Anonymous on Sun, 04/05/2015 - 17:12
A thirsty glass

What is the literary devices used in 'a thirsty glass' ?
Synecdoche or Metonymy or Transferred Epithet or Hyperbole ??

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 03/12/2015 - 13:04
Transferred Epithet

As the characteristic of being thirsty is transferred to the glass
In fact, we could call it an Anthropomorphism.

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 03/17/2015 - 15:18
metonymy

metonymy

Posted by Anonymous on Sun, 03/15/2015 - 10:34
What literary device could this be?

So the question is,

What is the term used to descibe the tehcnique/conceit used in an essay in which the author appropriates another written form (help wanted ad, medical script, recipe)?

I thought it could be an allusion but thats only a reference this is more of an inclusion of another piece, anyone know what this could be?

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 03/11/2015 - 20:02
Literary

WHAt literary is this the angry earthquake exploded upon the city of los angeles

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 03/12/2015 - 04:36
literary

this is personification

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 03/24/2015 - 22:06
Several

Anthropomorphism or Transferred epithet for "angry earthquake"
Alliteration for "earthquake exploded"

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 03/17/2015 - 15:21
Help!!

So my literature teacher told us about this thing that was like when someone gives someone compliment but it isn't really a compliment. Like usually it was between two different groups. The example she used was in /The Invisible Man/ a white man says "he knows more words than a pocket sized dictionary" about an intelligent black man. This sounds like a compliment yet the pocket-sized makes it much less of one. I want to use this in my paper but I don't remember what its called!!!

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 03/09/2015 - 02:29
it's sounds like an oxymoron

Oxymoron is a significant literary device as it allows the author to use contradictory, contrasting concepts placed together in a manner that actually ends up making sense in a strange, and slightly complex manner. An oxymoron is an interesting literary device because it helps to perceive a deeper level of truth and explore different layers of semantics while writing.

Does that help?

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 03/24/2015 - 21:38
Help is this a literary device of any kind?

I am in a writing intensive course, and I wrote an essay on H.G. Wells, "The Land Ironclad" I titled my essay....

Wells’ Usage of Character Quandary to Delve into Scientific and Social Contingency

What kind of literary device is "Character Quandry" in the title? Please help! A.S.A.P.

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 03/05/2015 - 20:39
literature

How do we answer literature passages and poems using literary devices

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 03/03/2015 - 05:38
literature

you firstly have to understand the subject or theme and then you critically appreciating by noticing the lliterary devices and employ them in line with the essence of the writer in using them....

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 03/04/2015 - 15:18
Zoot Suit Riot

How is the truth about what happened the night of the raid revealed

Posted by Anonymous on Sat, 02/28/2015 - 23:10
What literary device is being

What literary device is being used below?

"When stings are over it turns to pain"

Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 02/27/2015 - 00:46
"oh, Kinsmen! we must meet

"oh, Kinsmen! we must meet the common foe."

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 02/24/2015 - 21:43
these wall have ears

is it a methphor, personification, hyperbole or cliche

Posted by Anonymous on Sat, 02/21/2015 - 22:11

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