Questions and Answers

Here you can ask general questions related to literary devices and site visitors can try and help answer them. If you have a question about a specific literary device please use the list on the left and ask your question in the comments section for that literary device.

Comments

671 comments posted
Secrets...

Is this any type of literary device...
" I will tell the secret to you,
to you only you.
Come closer..."

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 03/20/2013 - 05:18
whats the name of the litarary devices

1.The wise fool was burning my vegetarian hamburger.
2.The clever yet quiet king thought a very long time before he gave his answer.
3.At very beginning of the story,the sun shone and smiled down on the flowers in the fields.
4.While she watched her children leaving on the train, she had a bitter sweet feeling in her heart.

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 02/20/2013 - 05:22
reading

Infer the theme of a word and explain how it is conveyed

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 02/18/2013 - 20:19
What literary tool is this?

What literary tool is this? "LIfe is not a spectator sport. If watchin' is all you're gonna do, the you're gonna watch your lif ego by without ya."

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 02/12/2013 - 21:03
English

Does the song Just The Way You Are By Bruno Mars have any literary devices ?o:

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 01/30/2013 - 08:48
what literary device is this?

“ they begged her to go live with her godmother; when she refused, the townspeople formed crews to rebuild the house

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 01/28/2013 - 06:15
Liking the protagonist - DEVICE?

Is there a literary device which makes the reader like the protagonist (like the goodie and hate the baddie) ??

thank you!

Posted by Anonymous on Sat, 01/26/2013 - 23:43
bias

bias

Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 05/31/2013 - 14:27
Does " You have my heart."

Does " You have my heart." have any Literary Devices in it??

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 01/23/2013 - 01:44
What literary device is this

What literary device is this quote? "As the summit of the mountains feels the quaking of the earth."

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 01/15/2013 - 23:29
transfered apithet

if anyone know about this literary device please clearify it

Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 12/14/2012 - 18:45
what literary device is this?

when a novel displays a paragraph of dialogue without informing the reader who is saying which lines... what literary device goes along with that?

for example...

"Maybe he was already gone."

"He wasn't"

"But maybe"

"No I could feel it. He wasn't."

Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 12/07/2012 - 02:11
Anecdotes?

what are anecdotes it's not on the list :|?

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 12/03/2012 - 14:29
anecdotes

An anecdote is a short narrative. In persuasive writing anecdotes are used to influence the reader by appealing to her/his emotions.

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 01/17/2013 - 22:07
What literary device is "

What literary device is " that heaven finds means to kill your joys with love"

Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 11/23/2012 - 04:09
Personification

you're giving a non-living element human traits.

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 12/17/2012 - 05:05
What literary device is being

What literary device is being used when saying "a taste of freedom"

Posted by Anonymous on Sun, 11/18/2012 - 19:41
poem

"Shepherds swains shall" is an example of what literary device?

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 11/13/2012 - 18:55
alliteration

alliteration

Posted by Anonymous on Sun, 01/27/2013 - 00:29
Question

What is it called when the main character in a novel asks questions or talks to ones self. Kind of like a soliloquy but in a novel. Help please!

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 11/12/2012 - 04:01
VERBAL IRONY

What is Verbal Irony?

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 10/29/2012 - 23:29
What is verbal irony?

The speaker says one thing , but means something else.

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 12/11/2012 - 00:08
Verbal Irony

Verbal Irony is when a character says something that is the opposite of what they mean. A form of verbal irony is sarcasm, which is normally used specifically to be insulting, rude, or condescending. An example of sarcasm would be to say "Hey genius," when talking to someone who is not a genius. An example of plain verbal irony would be to say "This is wonderful," right after an event that is not wonderful.

To be clear, while all sarcasm is verbal irony, not all verbal irony is sarcasm. Sarcasm is specifically used in a more negative sense, while non-sarcastic verbal irony is simply saying the opposite of what you mean.

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 11/20/2012 - 01:15
which devise is this!?!?!?

Swear to shake it up, if you swear to listen

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 10/24/2012 - 05:05
even if the skys get rough??

is this any kind of literary devise? if so, which??

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 10/24/2012 - 04:28
What literary device is this?

No wonder you’re flunking the hell out of here… You don’t do one damn thing the way you’re supposed to. I mean it. Not one damn thing”

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 10/23/2012 - 02:13
literary device?

justice bends the arrow at your heart, and strains the bow, and it is nothing but the mere pleasure of God
what literary device is this?

Posted by Anonymous on Sat, 09/29/2012 - 19:57
literary device

what literary devices are use in the statement "This store is going to make me lose my lunch"

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 09/27/2012 - 00:36
Literary Devices used in Hymns

Im trying to do a research project on hymns of Charles Wesley and I need to know what kind of literary devices are used in hymns!

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 09/26/2012 - 20:43
What is it?

What is a device that uses extra word which make the sentence longer.
Ex. mary had two shoe on her feet while she ran across the field.

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 09/26/2012 - 15:54
I LOVE THIS SITE!!!

It saved my life (or homework)!

Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 09/21/2012 - 15:54
Literary device

What kind of literary device is 1 Thessalonians?

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 03/28/2013 - 11:25
project

me to I had no clue what a literary divice was untill i found this site it shure is helpfull
and thanks to this site i hope to get an "A" on my 100pt. project.

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 10/10/2012 - 23:08
What literary device, if any?

Unable to still our anguish...

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 09/18/2012 - 03:11
english

In literary terms, define novella and fiction

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 09/05/2012 - 06:31
what device is this called?

When an author starts their book/novel off with the END of the story, then works their way back up, telling the story up until the point where they reach where they originally started, what device is that author using?

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 08/28/2012 - 04:03
structure

structure is the way that a story is built. The author is definitely not using "chronological order," or telling the story in the order in which things happenned. Structure is any order.

So basically, the author is just using a different kind of STRUCTURE.

(sorry for not jumping right to the point ^^;)

Posted by Anonymous on Sat, 09/22/2012 - 20:33
Idiom?

Is an idiom considered a literary device?

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 08/28/2012 - 03:52
Idiom

No, idiom is qualified as figurative language

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 05/27/2013 - 20:45
what device?

have you no sense? whats the name of the device that rearranges words in a sentence to add in affect

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 08/21/2012 - 23:29
Syntax.

Syntax is the arrangement of words and sentences.

English and Spanish syntax are very different if directly translated.

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 08/27/2012 - 04:46
What device is this?

I felt a cocktail of beautiful emotions.

Posted by Anonymous on Sun, 08/19/2012 - 18:51
metaphor

It isn't actually a COCKTAIL of beautiful emotions, but the way it is written, it may as well be. It is a mixture of beautiful emotions, and a cocktail a mixture of different... fruits?
Anyway, they both have one thing in common: both are mixtures.

Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 08/31/2012 - 00:54
Literary device

What is the literary device in can not learn an old dog new tricks,as the saying goes.

Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 08/17/2012 - 02:02
?personification

"birds are uneasy"

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 08/07/2012 - 20:44
no

It is possible for animals to feel uneasiness, too. It's not just a "person" thing.

Have you ever seen a dog cower underneath the table during a thunderstorm? What else can that be describes with besides uneasiness?

HOWEVER, that doesn't necessarily mean that the birds know exactly what is wrong.

Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 08/31/2012 - 00:58
? personification

"an ominous gale, a gust of ice-cold wind, startling in the otherwise humid air."

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 08/07/2012 - 20:41
no

The wind is "startling in the otherwise humid air." It is STARTLING to all who feel it because they are not used to the cold after such heat, and are STARTLED to feel such a sudden and violent reminder that it cannot be like that forever.

It can be related to taking showers-- you have the hot water on for so long that you become used to it, and then you have to turn off the shower. You shiver because of that sudden, unfamiliar blast of frigid water.

Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 08/31/2012 - 01:02
Not really.

I don't think so, but I'm not an English major.

There could be several devices applied to this sentence, but personification does not stand out.

Personification is giving an inanimate object human like traits.

For instance: "My bed is the best lover, it holds me tight and keeps me warm at night."

A bed is obviously not a person and cannot ACTUALLY provide the emotional support the writer is suggesting.

Your sentence is simply providing tone and setting, maybe even mood.

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 08/27/2012 - 04:43
? metaphor

"an explosion of thunder"

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 08/07/2012 - 20:40

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