Synecdoche

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23 comments posted
synecdoche

the heads of the corporation gathered together.
(Each executive is a "brain" that makes decisions.)

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 10/27/2014 - 04:02
Respond

would " sick at heart " be a synecdoche

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 08/27/2014 - 01:43
is dis an example?

The souls of the passagers depend on the sole of the driver?

Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 08/15/2014 - 16:54
Gud

Gud

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 07/02/2014 - 14:18
Synecdoche, NY

I've heard of it...

Posted by Anonymous on Sun, 05/25/2014 - 20:46
?

would shut your lips be one? or jealous tongue?

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 04/09/2014 - 01:34
apprentice

is HOUSEHOLD is a kind of synecdoche?

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 01/23/2014 - 11:58
how to differentiate metonymy and synecdoche

Synecdoche is often confused with another literary device called metonymy. Both may resemble each other to some extent but are not the same. Synecdoche refers to a whole of a thing by the name of any one of its parts. For example, calling a car “wheels” is a synecdoche because a part of a car “wheels” stands for the whole car. However, in metonymy, the word we use to describe another thing is closely linked to that particular thing, but is not necessarily a part of it. For example, “crown” that refers to power or authority is a metonymy used to replace the king or the queen.

Posted by Anonymous on Sun, 09/29/2013 - 04:23
Question

What is the difference of Synedoche to Oxymoron?

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 08/07/2013 - 12:33
They are nothing alike! In

They are nothing alike! In an unprofessional version of the definitions, an oxymoron is when something "weird" actually makes sense (the example, "cold fire in his eyes..."), and a synecdoche is when we say we want something, but the whole of that something is not said ("All hands on deck!"-- the speaker wants everyone to help out (their whole beings, their whole bodies), but (s)he only says hands).

Posted by Anonymous on Sun, 09/08/2013 - 14:26
My favorite

The synecdoche that I always remember is "All Hands on Deck!"

Posted by Anonymous on Sun, 06/23/2013 - 14:09
Pater Familius

The salesman wanted to speak to the head of the house.

I think this is an example of synecdoche.

Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 03/22/2013 - 16:26
From Sheila Mant short story

When Sheila says of Eric, "He strokes number four" and she is implying that he plays guitar, would that be synecdoche?

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 03/19/2013 - 21:13
yes it is

yes it is

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 03/20/2013 - 17:24
Hmm...

It almost seems to be a kind of metaphor, using a part in comparison to the whole. Am I way off with this?

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 03/07/2013 - 01:27
QS

Does "Soul Meets Body" a example of a Synecdoche?

Posted by Anonymous on Sun, 02/10/2013 - 21:31
"Soul Meets Body"

Not exactly. A better example would be "That guy has nice wheels!" in reference to his car. The wheels are only a part of the whole car.

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 02/26/2013 - 23:27
Pronunciation

Sin-ek-doh-key

Posted by Anonymous on Sun, 01/06/2013 - 21:36
?

how do you pronounce that word

Posted by Anonymous on Sun, 12/23/2012 - 23:27
Example

Would 'Diamond in the rough' be an example?

Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 10/12/2012 - 05:17
Response

No. It is a piece of the whole.
What is the whole in "diamond in the rough"?

Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 11/02/2012 - 23:12
?

Across the bounding waves? waves for ocean?

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 06/21/2012 - 21:02
To above..

Yes, this is definitely a part of the whole.
Waves (part) are part of the (whole) ocean.

Most often synecdoches are used when someone, for example, blames a whole beauty salon for the mess-up of one hairdresser. "That salon is awful! Look what they've done to my hair!". It is not the salon (whole), it is the individual hairdresser.

Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 11/02/2012 - 23:15

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