Synesthesia

Comments

24 comments posted
Is this an example?

Is this an example of synesthesia?
"Did he smell the panic...?" (From Something Wicked this Way Comes)

Posted by Anonymous on Sun, 11/27/2016 - 20:01
In "The Crucible," John

In "The Crucible," John Proctor says that the "lilacs taste purple." In the poem "Harlem: A Poem," by Walter Dean Myers, he writes that "colors are loud enough to be heard."

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 03/17/2016 - 18:48
From "Island Man"

Is "Muffling muffling" an example of this? I hope it is!

Posted by Anonymous on Sat, 01/02/2016 - 20:46
Not Really

Without seeing this in context, I would say no. Both of the "mufflings" involve the same sense, sound. Synesthesia is the connection of 2 or more senses.

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 05/31/2016 - 21:06
Macbeth

is 'the taste of fears' an example of synesthesia

Posted by Anonymous on Sun, 10/11/2015 - 06:44
yes, of course

yes, of course

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 03/15/2016 - 19:21
how?

Can you explain to me how this is an example of synestesia?

Posted by Anonymous on Sun, 11/06/2016 - 02:48
The Phantom Tollbooth

"Milo nibbled carefully at the letter and discovered that it was quite and delicious-- just the way you'd expect an A to taste" (49).
He's eating the letter A in here; there's a ton of references to synesthesia in The Phantom Tollbooth.

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 06/30/2015 - 00:07
Thanks

This is so useful. I am a aspireing writer who is 11 years old and have gotten one poem profesionally published. This has helped me on the way so much. Thanks!

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 05/27/2015 - 08:43
yeah, cool

i think i get it

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 05/18/2015 - 16:25
synesthesia

how can you tell the difference between synesthesia and personification?

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 05/11/2015 - 16:42
Personification is giving an

Personification is giving an object or animal a human-like description. Synesthesia is connecting seemingly unconnected senses, like "smelling colors" or "seeing sounds" and the like.

Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 05/22/2015 - 01:33
Cool

Cool

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 04/23/2015 - 02:10
From "A Midsummer Night's Dream"...

I see a voice. Now will I to the chink,
To spy and I can hear my Thisbe's face.

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 11/04/2014 - 20:28
Synesthesia

Great example!

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 12/16/2014 - 13:22
So So helpful!

I am so glad I ran across this site while I was looking for study aids for American Literature. It's great! Thanks!

Posted by Anonymous on Sun, 07/06/2014 - 14:56
help

what's an example? kinda lost.

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 05/27/2014 - 16:06
A good example is the above

A good example is the above "Sound of Blue." 'Blue' being a color which is visual and 'Sound' being in reference to an auditory stimulus. It indicates 'hearing' and color, which connects two different senses.

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 06/25/2014 - 16:11
Such a cool word too

Synethesia

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 03/12/2014 - 05:26
actually

*Synesthesia
and i agree

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 05/08/2014 - 02:43
Really Helpful!!

Thanks:)

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 08/29/2013 - 14:56
another example!

"a sweet sound"

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 05/09/2013 - 05:34
synesthesia

"metallic / silence" (Margaret Atwood: Variation on the word Love) is a good example for synesthesia, as it connects two different sensory images, such as metallic - a tactile image, and silence, which is auditory

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 10/23/2012 - 11:24
Great Site!

I absolutely love this site! Great for anyone who loves writing and reading

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 04/23/2012 - 07:21

Post new comment

  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd>
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

More information about formatting options