Tragedy

Comments

41 comments posted
The Great Gatsby

Would F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby be considered to be a tragedy?

Posted by Anonymous on Sat, 05/28/2016 - 13:42
yes

yes

Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 09/09/2016 - 10:16
A Tragedy that's sad and happy?

In The Jungle Book (the original version of the story, not the movie version), the book ends with Mowgli realizing that he must go to live with other humans and forever leave the jungle and all his jungle friends (spoilers!). The ending feels sort of happy because it has a sense of finality and because Mowgli finally finds where he belongs. But it also feels really sad because Mowgli's leaving his friends and family, and he'll never see them again. Does this qualify as a tragedy or a tragic ending?
The novel as a whole isn't entirely sad or tragic; it's just the ending really that's sad.

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 04/06/2016 - 04:03
very intresting, Thanks a

very intresting, Thanks a million.

Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 01/08/2016 - 19:26
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Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 12/11/2015 - 17:08
thanks

thanks

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 11/30/2015 - 00:52
Thanxxxx

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Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 10/08/2015 - 13:09
Yes, but Caesar is not the

Yes, but Caesar is not the protagonist; Brutus is. Brutus wants to rectify/"right the wrong" by agreeing to join the conspirators to prevent his "BFF" from becoming king, "which Cassius and the rest of the conspirators "fear." Brutus--a noble man by birth and by intention, for he wishes to preserve the Republic,-- joins in not out of ill-will for his Caesar but out of love for Rome. In essence, Caesar is a flat character because he is too self-involved, predictable, and grossly inadequate to be a leader; he dismisses his wife's significant dream, then reluctantly indulges her, only to readily accept Marcus Brutus's spin on the dream, "...This [blood] means that Rome will thrive under Caesar..." What follows is Caesar be lead like a sheep to his death without the animal instinct of restlessness (the innate sense that something is wrong).

Brutus then takes center stage; he must be the articulate, noble spokesperson who will impart to the poor Romans why the "noble men" had to kill their "ambitious" leader. So far all goes his way; then, against Cassius's judicious advisement, Brutus lets Mark Anthony pay his respects to his friend Caesar only to result in an uprising to routes the "noble men" out of town... (Peripeteia--reversal of situation: Brutus and the "noble men" lose the upper hand. At this point, Mark Anthony becomes the leader fo the triumvirate formed in conjunction with Lepidus and Octavius Caesar who must fight and defeat the

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 11/18/2015 - 20:33
It's a tragedy, it's not about a protagonist, really.

The point of a protagonist, usually, is that he follows the normal pattern of crisis, rising action, climax, falling action, resolution and most usually comes to a happy ending or a mostly happy ending. However, you can't use this idea when looking at Greek tragedies to point out who wins at the end, or has the happiest ending, and assign that person as the protagonist. In a Greek tragedy, the point is to a, teach some kind of a moral, and b, allow the audience to feel both pity and fear. This is similar to a cautionary tale like The Boy Who Cried Wolf, or The Ant and The Grasshopper, because those are incredibly stupid characters we know nothing about and their tragedies cause us to not want to do the things they do and get hurt by the consequences, meaning we are cautioned by the cautionary tale out of fear of bad things. This fear is the same as the catharsis, the purging of emotions through experiencing said fear, but also pity, because we see ourselves more in the characters of the Greek tragedy. In Romeo and Juliet, rushing in to love without being smart killed the lovers, so we pity them. Caesar dies out of pride leading to the consequence of a betrayal, which we are all prideful, so we can still experience a sense of pity. Macbeth wants too much out of life and therefore is killed from desires of success. While these characters don't follow the normal pattern of protagonist, they are still the main character, and many people would still call them the protagonist, because they are the ones developed so much that they relate to us and our own foibles. The difference is, they aren't supposed to have a good end, just like not every single person in an audience will come to a good end, if they aren't careful. The people at the end who bring some sort of resolution and peace are not protagonists, and sometimes only show up at the end for the most part like in Hamlet.

Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 07/22/2016 - 05:25
Makes a lot of sense. I got

Makes a lot of sense. I got vital information for my assignment

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 10/08/2015 - 04:08
i liked it

I like it

Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 07/24/2015 - 14:49
Note

Traditionally the lead must have a tragic flaw which eventually is the cause of their downfall - eg Macbeth's ambition

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 04/08/2015 - 18:15
Thanxx

IT help me for my assignment

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 12/24/2014 - 16:05
Jelof

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Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 12/09/2014 - 14:42
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Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 02/26/2015 - 21:26
wow it good and

wow it good and helpful...thanks

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 10/27/2014 - 20:08
rlly awesum!!!!!11!!!

thx 4 this post. rely helpful with my English praject

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 10/20/2014 - 17:44
thanx

its really helpfull for me so thank you soo much

Posted by Anonymous on Wed, 09/24/2014 - 14:09
great

it helpep me a lot for my assinment

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 08/21/2014 - 11:05
What does..

What does helpep mean?

Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 05/15/2015 - 16:51
this helped alot for my

this helped alot for my assesment

Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 05/23/2014 - 10:42
Thank you very much

Thank you very much

Posted by Anonymous on Sun, 05/04/2014 - 02:41
This site is really

This site is really helpful...Thanks : )

Posted by Anonymous on Sun, 04/13/2014 - 20:35
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Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 02/25/2014 - 07:52
Very helpful

Thanks for the help, it was clear, concise, and the example was excellent. Well done!

Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 02/21/2014 - 20:08
caesar

"Et tu Brute! Then fall Caesar" Caesar didnot die of the stab wounds inflicted by conspirators, he died of a broken heart. It also stresses on the immensity of the plot, i.e, a plot so total that even his best friend Brutus is a part of it.

Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 12/27/2013 - 09:52
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Thanks billions, will be using this site often.

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 11/12/2013 - 09:56
Wrong

It's actually "Et tu Brute" I've read the play.

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 04/11/2013 - 07:21
Shakespeare

Well... Shakespeare could have made a mistake. I think the site is using the term in the Roman's historical record.

Posted by Anonymous on Sun, 11/02/2014 - 04:32
It's not a case of a historical record...

It's the vocative case in Latin. If you were addressing Brutus or, say, Sextus, you'd say, "Oi, Brute!" or, "Oi, Sexte!"

There is no historical record of what Caesar said. Shakespeare made this up.

Posted by Anonymous on Sat, 11/15/2014 - 01:00
Really helpful.

Really helpful.

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 03/14/2013 - 20:53
Really really good helped me

Really really good helped me heaps

Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 02/15/2013 - 09:04
what

whats the tragedy in the example that he get killed by his best friend or that he get dfeted

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 02/07/2013 - 06:34
Well, both

The tragedy in Julius Caesar is that he gets defeated at the hand of his best friend. Any defeat would have been tragic, but the horrible betrayal is what makes it memorable.

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 07/25/2013 - 22:42
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Thank u so much

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 01/07/2013 - 11:48
awesome site

agreed. very thorough.

Posted by Anonymous on Sun, 01/13/2013 - 21:55
Love this site !

Love this site !

Posted by Anonymous on Tue, 12/11/2012 - 23:32
Julius Caesar

Well this seems very awkward that I'm reading that very book at this very moment.

Posted by Anonymous on Fri, 10/26/2012 - 01:32
boo

Not funny

Posted by Anonymous on Mon, 08/25/2014 - 03:40
great

great

Posted by Anonymous on Sat, 06/23/2012 - 17:13
AWESOME IT HELPED ME A LOT

AWESOME IT HELPED ME A LOT

Posted by Anonymous on Thu, 06/14/2012 - 16:29

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