Consonance

Consonance is a literary device that involves the repetition of consonant sounds, typically at the end of words or stressed syllables within words. Unlike alliteration, which repeats the initial sounds of words, consonance emphasizes the similarity of consonant sounds throughout a phrase or sentence, creating a rhythmic and musical effect. This device is often used in poetry and prose to add emphasis to certain words, create a specific mood or tone, or to simply make the language more memorable and pleasing to the ear.

Examples of consonance:

“He struck a streak of bad luck.” – The repetition of the “k” sound in “struck,” “streak,” and “luck” creates a musical effect in this sentence.

“The lumpy, bumpy road wound round and round.” – The repetition of the “r” and “d” sounds in “lumpy,” “bumpy,” “road,” “wound,” “round,” and “round” creates a sense of movement and rhythm in this sentence.

“Mike likes his bike.” – The repetition of the “k” sound in “Mike,” “likes,” and “bike” creates a playful and memorable effect.

“Pitter patter, pitter patter, went the rain on the roof.” – The repetition of the “t” and “r” sounds in “pitter,” “patter,” and “rain” creates a sense of the sound and rhythm of rain falling.

“I will crawl away the ball and bat and bother of the day.” – The repetition of the “b” sound in “ball,” “bat,” and “bother” creates a memorable and rhythmic effect in this sentence from the poem “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” by T.S. Eliot.

3 thoughts on “Consonance”

    1. Consonance is the repetition of consonant sounds whereas Assonance is the repetition of sounds produced by vowels.

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