Synesthesia

Definition:
While the term synesthesia literally refers to a medical condition wherein one or many of the sensory modalities become joined to one another, in literature it refers to the depiction of a strong connection, link or bond between the different senses. Characters in literature are sometimes described to be experiences synesthesia. Synesthesia is the conflation of the senses.

Example:
The Sound of Blue by Hollu Payne which portrays synesthesia with respect to the Romantic ideal.

5 thoughts on “Synesthesia”

  1. The Phantom Tollbooth
    “Milo nibbled carefully at the letter and discovered that it was quite and delicious– just the way you’d expect an A to taste” (49).
    He’s eating the letter A in here; there’s a ton of references to synesthesia in The Phantom Tollbooth.

  2. In “The Crucible,” John Proctor says that the “lilacs taste purple.” In the poem “Harlem: A Poem,” by Walter Dean Myers, he writes that “colors are loud enough to be heard.”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.